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My Town Kalamazoo: WMU players trade basketballs for books

My Town Kalamazoo: WMU players trade basketballs for books

KALAMAZOO, Mich.—Students at Paramount Charter Academy recently welcomed some special guests during reading time.

Eight members of the Western Michigan University Women’s Basketball team read to students Nov. 21, in honor of the school’s college day.  The athletes also shared their reasons for attending WMU and joining the team.  Each student took home a WMU sports poster.

Paramount Charter Academy serves students in young 5s through eighth grade, focusing on a college-bound curriculum.

My Town: Schools awarded new grant to improve arts programs

My Town: Schools awarded new grant to improve arts programs

GREENVILLE, Mich.—School arts programs in Greenville and Kalamazoo are getting a financial boost from a new program.

Greenville Middle School and Loy Norrix High School in Kalamazoo are two of 43 schools in the state to get a grant of up to $1,200 from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs and Michigan Youth Arts.   The funding will be used toward buying or repairing classroom materials used for the arts, including visual arts, music programs, writing and media arts. 

“Applicants from across the state requested a total of $128,000 in grant funding, which exceeded well beyond our expectations, said Marianne Dorais, executive director of Michigan Youth Arts. “While this highlights the success of the program’s debut, it also shines a light on the increasing need for funding within arts education classrooms.”

My Town: South-Town development the focus of Kalamazoo PlacePlan

My Town: South-Town development the focus of Kalamazoo PlacePlan

KALAMAZOO, Mich.—Improvements may be on the way to the city’s transportation system.

The city’s PlacePlan project calls for a sustainable network of biking, walking and transit around Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s new healthy living campus.  The plan created by community members also focuses on opportunities to grow the farmers market.

About $42 million in new development is already planned for the South-Town area, including a new culinary institute and food innovation building for Kalamazoo Valley Community College.

“Once the campus is open we will hope to have developers saying, ‘Hmm, these students are going to need housing and they’re probably going to want to eat and shop so maybe we should consider some residential units, mixed-use, and some new restaurants,” said Rebekah Kik, city planner for Kalamazoo

School of Choice for Teachers

School of Choice for Teachers

Thanks to Schools of Choice programs in Michigan, students are afforded the opportunity to choose a school environment that best meets their learning needs. These programs also offer our state’s educators opportunities to teach in environments that are best suited for them. Just as some teachers flourish in a traditional school, there are those who prefer teaching at a virtual public school, such as Michigan Connections Academy, the school where I teach.

I work with an incredible team of teachers – they are state-certified, specially trained in online learning, recognized as Highly Qualified under the guidelines of the No Child Left Behind Act—and live in Michigan. In fact, even though we teach in a virtual school, more than 60 teachers travel to the school’s office in Lansing every day to lead online instruction for more than 1,700 students across Michigan in grades kindergarten through 12.

Nexus Academy of Grand Rapids Awarded AdvancED Accreditation

Nexus Academy of Grand Rapids Awarded AdvancED Accreditation

Nexus Academy of Grand Rapids, a “blended” tuition-free public high school for students in grades 9-12, has been awarded accreditation from the national accreditation commission, AdvancED. The accreditation report praised Nexus Academy of Grand Rapids for its ability to: effectively use technology to align student schedules based on needs; provide students with immediate feedback on assignments; and to operate the school in an efficient manner for student success.

“Receiving the AdvancED accreditation demonstrates our commitment to excellence and the high quality of our school,” said Dan McMinn, Nexus Academy of Grand Rapids principal.

Students Learn R-E-S-P-E-C-T and What It Means for Their Success in School

KALAMAZOO, Mich., October 14, 2014—Students at Paramount Charter Academy are not only studying math, reading, and science this month, but they are also learning about respect and how it shapes their personal character.

 

Along with an academic program geared toward college prep, Paramount also offers a Moral Focus curriculum. Each month, teachers incorporate a different virtue into their lesson plans. The virtue for October is respect which is really important for teachers and students to hold for each other in order to have a successful classroom.

 

“We want our students to grow academically and emotionally,” said Principal Jodi Donkin. “Learning the virtues outlined in the Moral Focus curriculum helps students think about their actions and how they impact others.

WMU-COOLEY LAW SCHOOL ASSISTANT DEAN TRACEY BRAME TO RECEIVE THE WHITNEY M. YOUNG JR. SERVICE AWARD

WMU-COOLEY LAW SCHOOL ASSISTANT DEAN TRACEY BRAME TO RECEIVE THE WHITNEY M. YOUNG JR. SERVICE AWARD

WMU-COOLEY LAW SCHOOL ASSISTANT DEAN TRACEY BRAME TO RECEIVE THE WHITNEY M. YOUNG JR. SERVICE AWARD FROM THE BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA
Service award will honor Brame’s efforts in implementing youth Scouting opportunities

 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. – Oct. 2, 2014 – The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) will award both WMU-Cooley Law School Assistant Dean Tracey Brame and her husband, Kenyatta Brame, who is an adjunct professor at WMU-Cooley, with the Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award for their implementation of youth Scouting opportunities. The service award will be presented at the Fulfilling the Dream fundraising luncheon on Monday, October 6 at the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel.

 

The Whitney M. Young Jr.